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Intestinal schistosomiasis in mothers and young children in Uganda: investigation of field-applicable markers of bowel morbidity.

Betson, M, Sousa-Figueiredo, JC, Rowell, C, Kabatereine, NB and Stothard, JR (2010) Intestinal schistosomiasis in mothers and young children in Uganda: investigation of field-applicable markers of bowel morbidity. Am J Trop Med Hyg, 83 (5). pp. 1048-1055.

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Abstract

To control intestinal schistosomiasis at a national level in sub-Saharan Africa, there is a need for field-applicable markers to measure morbidity associated with this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fecal calprotectin or fecal occult blood assays could be used as morbidity indicators for intestinal schistosomiasis. The study was carried out in Uganda with a cohort of young children (n = 1,327) and their mothers (n = 726). The prevalence of egg-patent schistosomiasis was 27.2% in children and 47.6% in mothers. No association was found between schistosomiasis infection and fecal calprotectin in children (n = 83, odds ratio [OR] = 1.08, P = 0.881), although an inverse relationship (n = 58, OR = 0.17, P = 0.043) was found in mothers. Fecal occult blood was strongly associated with Schistosoma mansoni infection in children (n = 814, OR = 2.30, P < 0.0001) and mothers (n = 448, OR = 1.95, P = 0.004). Fecal occult blood appears to be useful for measuring morbidity associated with intestinal schistosomiasis and could be used in assessing the impact of control programs upon disease.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Betson, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sousa-Figueiredo, JCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rowell, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kabatereine, NBUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Stothard, JRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : November 2010
Identification Number : 10.4269/ajtmh.2010.10-0307
Uncontrolled Keywords : Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Albendazole, Anthelmintics, Child, Child, Preschool, Feces, Female, Humans, Infant, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Middle Aged, Morbidity, Occult Blood, Odds Ratio, Praziquantel, Prevalence, Schistosomiasis mansoni, Uganda, Young Adult
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Copyright © 2010 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 14 Aug 2015 09:49
Last Modified : 14 Aug 2015 09:49
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/808122

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