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Voltage-dependent calcium channels in chondrocytes: roles in health and disease.

Matta, C, Zákány, R and Mobasheri, A (2015) Voltage-dependent calcium channels in chondrocytes: roles in health and disease. Curr Rheumatol Rep, 17 (7).

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Abstract

Chondrocytes, the single cell type in adult articular cartilage, have conventionally been considered to be non-excitable cells. However, recent evidence suggests that their resting membrane potential (RMP) is less negative than that of excitable cells, and they are fully equipped with channels that control ion, water and osmolyte movement across the chondrocyte membrane. Amongst calcium-specific ion channels, members of the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) family are expressed in chondrocytes where they are functionally active. L-type VDCC inhibitors such as nifedipine and verapamil have contributed to our understanding of the roles of these ion channels in chondrogenesis, chondrocyte signalling and mechanotransduction. In this narrative review, we discuss published data indicating that VDCC function is vital for chondrocyte health, especially in regulating proliferation and maturation. We also highlight the fact that activation of VDCC function appears to accompany various inflammatory aspects of osteoarthritis (OA) and, based on in vitro data, the application of nifedipine and/or verapamil may be a promising approach for ameliorating OA severity. However, very few studies on clinical outcomes are available regarding the influence of calcium antagonists, which are used primarily for treating cardiovascular conditions in OA patients. This review is intended to stimulate further research on the chondrocyte 'channelome', contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies and facilitate the retargeting and repositioning of existing pharmacological agents currently used for other comorbidities for the treatment of OA.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Microbial and Cellular Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Matta, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zákány, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mobasheri, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : July 2015
Identification Number : 10.1007/s11926-015-0521-4
Related URLs :
Additional Information : The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11926-015-0521-4
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 24 Jun 2015 17:35
Last Modified : 22 Jul 2016 01:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/807871

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