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Reducing alcohol misuse in patients attending an accident and emergency department: A randomised controlled trial

Patton, R, Crawford, M and Touquet, R (2003) Reducing alcohol misuse in patients attending an accident and emergency department: A randomised controlled trial Proceedings of the British Psychological Society, 11 (2). p. 281.

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine the effects at one year of referral for brief intervention by an alcohol health worker (AHW) on levels of alcohol consumption, psychiatric morbidity and quality of life among patients attending an accident and emergency department (AED) with alcohol related problems. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Methods: An AED doctor using the Paddington Alcohol Test (PAT) screened patients who presented to the AED. All those identified as misusing alcohol and meeting the inclusion criteria were asked if they would accept help aimed at assisting them to reduce their alcohol intake. Those randomised to Treatment were given a card which detailed the time and place of an appointment to discuss alcohol consumption with an AHW. Participants were also given a copy of a leaflet ‘Think About Drink’ Those randomised to Control were given the leaflet but no appointment. At baseline demographic details were collected together with details of current level of alcohol consumption. At six months a telephone interview was conducted in order to assess alcohol consumption and psychiatric morbidity (GHQ-12). At 12 months alcohol consumption (using PAT and Form 90), psychiatric morbidity and quality of life using Euroqol EQ-5D were measured. Results: 5242 patients screened, 1159 identified as hazardous drinkers (22 per cent), 659 consented and randomised. Data collection at six-months completed (77 per cent). Data collection at 12 months is ongoing. Conclusions: This pragmatic study should provide evidence of the worth of screening and brief interventions for alcohol misuse applied in the AED and offer guidance on the conduct of psychological research within busy hospital settings.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Patton, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Crawford, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Touquet, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 August 2003
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 10:53
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 17:25
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/807483

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