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MSW as a Resource Pt 2: A case study in sustainable management

Cox, J-A, Druckman, A, Jesson, DA, Mulheron, M, Smyth, M and Trew, H (2015) MSW as a Resource Pt 2: A case study in sustainable management Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Waste and Resource Management.

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Abstract

WX Weight of material to be managed by a particular option Abstract Waste is intricate to manage. With greater attention now being paid to the use of waste as a resource, there is an increasing need to develop sustainable and secure management options for the most complex material resource streams. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to look to those materials, which due to their complex structure have not traditionally been recycled, and so remain in the residual waste stream. This paper presents a methodology that has been developed to enable local authorities, or their equivalents, to assess the environmental and economic feasibility of collecting complex material streams separately, in order to improve their management of municipal solid waste. The methodology utilises available data from a number of sources, to determine the feasibility of options available. The methodology is applied to a case study in Surrey, England, in relation to the management of Absorbent Hygiene Products. Currently this waste is collected as part of the residual stream, and dealt with either through landfill or energy from waste. The result of applying the new methodology suggests that the optimum solution is the separate collection of Absorbent Hygiene Products and subsequent the sterilisation and recycling.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Cox, J-AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Druckman, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jesson, DAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mulheron, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Smyth, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Trew, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 10 February 2015
Identification Number : 10.1680/warm.14.00012
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 10:53
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 17:23
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/807368

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