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First Fatality Associated with Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus 5 in an Asian Elephant: Pathological Findings and Complete Viral Genome Sequence

Wilkie, GS, Davison, AJ, Kerr, K, Stidworthy, MF, Redrobe, S, Steinbach, Falko, Dastjerdi, A and Denk, D (2014) First Fatality Associated with Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus 5 in an Asian Elephant: Pathological Findings and Complete Viral Genome Sequence Scientific Reports, 4, 6299.

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Abstract

Infections of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) can cause a rapid, highly lethal, hemorrhagic disease, which primarily affects juvenile animals up to the age of four years. So far, the majority of deaths have been attributed to infections with genotype EEHV1 or, more rarely, EEHV3 and EEHV4. Here, we report the pathological characteristics of the first fatality linked to EEHV5 infection, and describe the complete viral DNA sequence. Gross post-mortem and histological findings were indistinguishable from lethal cases previously attributed to other EEHV genotypes, and the presence of characteristic herpesviral inclusions in capillary endothelial cells at several sites was consistent with the diagnosis of acute EEHV infection. Molecular analysis confirmed the presence of EEHV5 DNA and was followed by sequencing of the viral genome directly from post-mortem material. The genome is 180,800 bp in size and contains 120 predicted protein-coding genes, five of which are fragmented and presumably nonfunctional. The seven families of paralogous genes recognized in EEHV1 are also represented in EEHV5. The overall degree of divergence (37%) between the EEHV5 and EEHV1 genomes, and phylogenetic analysis of eight conserved genes, support the proposed classification of EEHV5 into a new species (Elephantid herpesvirus 5).

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Veterinary Medicine
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Wilkie, GS
Davison, AJ
Kerr, K
Stidworthy, MF
Redrobe, S
Steinbach, Falkof.steinbach@surrey.ac.uk
Dastjerdi, A
Denk, D
Date : 9 September 2014
Funders : Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Identification Number : 10.1038/srep06299
Copyright Disclaimer : This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder in order to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : Science & Technology, Multidisciplinary Sciences, Science & Technology - Other Topics, CODING CONTENT, MAXIMUS, INFECTION, DISEASE
Related URLs :
Additional Information : This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder in order to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Jan 2015 16:31
Last Modified : 08 Mar 2018 11:54
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/807080

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