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The Role of Dietary Sugars and De novo Lipogenesis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Moore, JB, Gunn, PJ and Fielding, BA (2014) The Role of Dietary Sugars and De novo Lipogenesis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease NUTRIENTS, 6 (12). pp. 5679-5703.

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Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Nutritional Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Moore, JBUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gunn, PJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Fielding, BAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 December 2014
Identification Number : 10.3390/nu6125679
Uncontrolled Keywords : Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Nutrition & Dietetics, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, sugar, fructose, glucose, de novo lipogenesis, CONTROLLED FEEDING TRIALS, SERUM URIC-ACID, CARBOHYDRATE RESPONSE ELEMENT, FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, STEAROYL-COA DESATURASE, INSULIN SENSITIVITY, METABOLIC SYNDROME, HEPATIC STEATOSIS, TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR, BINDING PROTEIN
Related URLs :
Additional Information : © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 13 Jan 2015 13:54
Last Modified : 31 Jan 2015 14:34
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/807002

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