University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Task-dependent and distinct roles of the temporoparietal junction and inferior frontal cortex in the control of imitation.

Hogeveen, J, Obhi, SS, Banissy, MJ, Santiesteban, I, Press, C, Catmur, C and Bird, G (2015) Task-dependent and distinct roles of the temporoparietal junction and inferior frontal cortex in the control of imitation. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci, 10 (7). pp. 1003-1009.

[img]
Preview
Text
Hogeveenetal14authorsversion.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (3MB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

The control of neurological networks supporting social cognition is crucially important for social interaction. In particular, the control of imitation is directly linked to interaction quality, with impairments associated with disorders characterized by social difficulties. Previous work suggests inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) are involved in controlling imitation, but the functional roles of these areas remain unclear. Here, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) was used to enhance cortical excitability at IFC and the TPJ prior to the completion of three tasks: (i) a naturalistic social interaction during which increased imitation is known to improve rapport, (ii) a choice reaction time task in which imitation needs to be inhibited for successful performance and (iii) a non-imitative control task. Relative to sham stimulation, stimulating IFC improved the context-dependent control of imitation-participants imitated more during the social interaction and less during the imitation inhibition task. In contrast, stimulating the TPJ reduced imitation in the inhibition task without affecting imitation during social interaction. Neither stimulation site affected the non-imitative control task. These data support a model in which IFC modulates imitation directly according to task demands, whereas TPJ controls task-appropriate shifts in attention toward representation of the self or the other, indirectly impacting upon imitation.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Hogeveen, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Obhi, SSUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Banissy, MJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Santiesteban, IUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Press, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Catmur, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bird, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : July 2015
Identification Number : 10.1093/scan/nsu148
Uncontrolled Keywords : imitation, inferior frontal cortex, mimicry, mirror system, temporoparietal junction, transcranial direct current stimulation
Related URLs :
Additional Information : This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Social Cognative and Affective Neuroscience following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Cognative and Affective Neuroscience is available online at http://scan.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/12/24/scan.nsu148
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 03 Mar 2015 16:35
Last Modified : 05 Dec 2015 02:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/806989

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800