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Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: genetic diversity of recent British isolates.

Frossard, JP, Hughes, GJ, Westcott, DG, Naidu, B, Williamson, S, Woodger, NG, Steinbach, Falko and Drew, TW (2013) Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: genetic diversity of recent British isolates. Veterinary Microbiology, 162 (2-4). pp. 507-518.

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Abstract

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) continues to be a significant problem for European pig producers, contributing to porcine respiratory disease complex, neonatal piglet mortality, infertility and occasional abortion storms. PRRS virus (PRRSV), a member of the arterivirus family with two defined major genotypes, has been shown to be quite genetically diverse. In the present study, genetic analysis of multiple gene regions of over 100 viruses isolated in Britain between 2003 and 2007 revealed that the diversity of British strains is now far greater than during the early 1990s. All isolates belong to genotype 1 (European). While some recent isolates are still very similar to early isolates, a wide range of more diverse viruses is now also circulating. Interestingly, some isolates were found to be very similar to a modified-live vaccine strain, and it is suggested that use of the vaccine has affected the evolution pattern of PRRS virus strains in Britain. Evidence of deletions in one viral gene, ORF3, and of genome recombination was also seen. A molecular clock model using the ORF7 sequences estimates the rate of substitution as 3.8 × 10(-3) per site per year, thereby dating the most recent common ancestor of all British viruses to 1991, coincident with the first outbreak of disease. Our findings therefore have implications for both the diagnostic and prophylactic methods currently being used, which are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Frossard, JPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hughes, GJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Westcott, DGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Naidu, BUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Williamson, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Woodger, NGUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Steinbach, Falkof.steinbach@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Drew, TWUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 23 March 2013
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.vetmic.2012.11.011
Copyright Disclaimer : Crown copyright © 2012 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Uncontrolled Keywords : Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Base Sequence, Female, Genetic Variation, Genotype, Great Britain, Molecular Epidemiology, Molecular Sequence Data, Nucleocapsid Proteins, Open Reading Frames, Phylogeny, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, Pregnancy, Sus scrofa, Swine, Viral Vaccines
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 27 Jul 2017 10:46
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 17:14
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/806875

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