University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Who rebounds most? Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for different UK socioeconomic groups

Chitnis, M, Sorrell, S, Druckman, A, Firth, SK and Jackson, T (2014) Who rebounds most? Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for different UK socioeconomic groups Ecological Economics, 106. pp. 12-32.

[img]
Preview
Text
Chitnis et al 2014 EcolEcon Who rebounds most .pdf - ["content_typename_UNSPECIFIED" not defined]
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (572kB) | Preview
[img] Text (deleted)
Chitnis et al 2014 EcolEcon Who rebounds most .pdf - ["content_typename_UNSPECIFIED" not defined]
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (572kB)
[img]
Preview
PDF (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

This study estimates the combined direct and indirect rebound effects from various types of energy efficiency improvement and behavioural change by UK households and explores how these effects vary with total expenditure. The methodology is based upon estimates of the expenditure elasticity and GHG intensity of 16 categories of goods and services, and allows for the capital cost and embodied emissions of the energy efficiency measures themselves. The study finds that rebound effects, in GHG terms, are modest (0-32%) for measures affecting domestic energy use, larger (25-65%) for measures affecting vehicle fuel use and very large (66-106%) for measures that reduce food waste. Furthermore, measures undertaken by low income households are associated with the largest rebound effects, with direct emissions forming a larger proportion of the total rebound effect for those households. Measures that are subsidised or affect highly taxed energy commodities may be less effective in reducing aggregate emissions. These findings highlight the importance of allowing for rebound effects within policy appraisals, as well as reinforcing the case for economy-wide carbon pricing. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Economics
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Chitnis, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sorrell, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Druckman, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Firth, SKUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jackson, TUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : October 2014
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.07.003
Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Ecological Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Ecological Economics, 106, October 2014, DOI 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.07.003.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 13 Feb 2015 09:48
Last Modified : 24 Apr 2015 13:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805924

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800