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The effect of eating rate on satiety in healthy and overweight people - A pilot study

Koidis, F, Brunger, L, Gibbs, M and Hampton, S (2014) The effect of eating rate on satiety in healthy and overweight people - A pilot study e-SPEN Journal, 9 (2).

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Abstract

Background & aims: Eating rate has gained the attention of scientific research due to its potential association with obesity and its co-morbidities, though evidence of its effects on satiety is limited. This study aimed to assess if eating rate affects postprandial satiety, in seven healthy and seven overweight/obese subjects. Methods: Participants were randomised to a 2-way crossover study of two controlled eating rates. Following anthropometric measurements, isocaloric meals were consumed at a slow and fast eating rate. Perceived satiety was measured at regular intervals using visual analogue scales. Results: The overweight group consumed the fast eating rate meal significantly faster (5±0.8min) than the healthy weight group (8.3±0.4min, p=0.004). Total area under curve from visual analogue scale showed a trend towards lower perceived fullness after the fast eating rate compared to slow rate (p=0.08) in all participants. Significant correlations were observed between eating time and body mass index (p=0.005), visceral fat score (p=0.0003) and trunk fat percentage (p=0.023) on the fast-rate protocol. Conclusions: The overweight fast eating rate group consumed the meal at a faster eating rate than the healthy weight fast eating rate group and the trend towards reduced perceived fullness when eating at a fast eating rate may, in part, contribute to increased food intake in overweight individuals. The correlations between eating time and body composition suggest faster eating rate is associated with a greater risk of higher BMI, visceral fat score and trunk fat percentage, making this the first laboratory study to make these observations. © 2014 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Koidis, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Brunger, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gibbs, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hampton, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2014
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.clnme.2014.02.004
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 13:11
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 17:02
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805923

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