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Adaptations in tibial cortical thickness and total volumetric bone density in postmenopausal South Asian women with small bone size.

Darling, AL, Hakim, OA, Horton, K, Gibbs, MA, Cui, L, Berry, JL, Lanham-New, SA and Hart, KH (2013) Adaptations in tibial cortical thickness and total volumetric bone density in postmenopausal South Asian women with small bone size. Bone, 55 (1). pp. 36-43.

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Abstract

There is some evidence that South Asian women may have an increased risk of osteoporosis compared with Caucasian women, although whether South Asians are at increased risk of fracture is not clear. It is unknown whether older South Asian women differ from Caucasian women in bone geometry. This is the first study, to the authors' knowledge, to use peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) to measure radial and tibial bone geometry in postmenopausal South Asian women. In comparison to Caucasian women, Asian women had smaller bone size at the 4% (-18% p<0.001) and 66% radius (-15% p=0.04) as well as increased total density at the 4% (+13% p=0.01) radius. For the tibia, they had a smaller bone size at the 4% (-16% p=0.005) and 14% (-38% p=0.002) sites. Also, Asians had increased cortical thickness (-17% p=0.04) at the 38% tibia, (in proportion to bone size (-30% p=0.003)). Furthermore, at the 4% and 14% tibia there were increased total densities (+12% to +29% p<0.01) and at the 14% tibia there was increased cortical density (+5% p=0.005) in Asians. These differences at the 14% and 38% (but not 4%) remained statistically significant after adjustment for Body Mass Index (BMI). These adaptations are similar to those seen previously in Chinese women. Asian women had reduced strength at the radius and tibia, evidenced by the 20-40% reduction in both polar Strength Strain Index (SSIp) and fracture load (under bending). Overall, the smaller bone size in South Asians is likely to be detrimental to bone strength, despite some adaptations in tibial cortical thickness and tibial and radial density which may partially compensate for this.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Nutritional Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Darling, ALUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hakim, OAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Horton, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gibbs, MAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cui, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Berry, JLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lanham-New, SAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hart, KHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 24 March 2013
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.bone.2013.03.006
Related URLs :
Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Bone. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Bone, 55(1), March 2013, DOI 10.1016/j.bone.2013.03.006.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 05 Sep 2014 18:14
Last Modified : 09 Sep 2014 13:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805890

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