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Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images.

Elangovan, P, Warren, LM, Mackenzie, A, Rashidnasab, A, Diaz, O, Dance, DR, Young, KC, Bosmans, H, Strudley, CJ and Wells, K (2014) Development and validation of a modelling framework for simulating 2D-mammography and breast tomosynthesis images. Phys Med Biol, 59 (15). pp. 4275-4293.

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Abstract

Planar 2D x-ray mammography is generally accepted as the preferred screening technique used for breast cancer detection. Recently, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been introduced to overcome some of the inherent limitations of conventional planar imaging, and future technological enhancements are expected to result in the introduction of further innovative modalities. However, it is crucial to understand the impact of any new imaging technology or methodology on cancer detection rates and patient recall. Any such assessment conventionally requires large scale clinical trials demanding significant investment in time and resources. The concept of virtual clinical trials and virtual performance assessment may offer a viable alternative to this approach. However, virtual approaches require a collection of specialized modelling tools which can be used to emulate the image acquisition process and simulate images of a quality indistinguishable from their real clinical counterparts. In this paper, we present two image simulation chains constructed using modelling tools that can be used for the evaluation of 2D-mammography and DBT systems. We validate both approaches by comparing simulated images with real images acquired using the system being simulated. A comparison of the contrast-to-noise ratios and image blurring for real and simulated images of test objects shows good agreement ( < 9% error). This suggests that our simulation approach is a promising alternative to conventional physical performance assessment followed by large scale clinical trials.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Elangovan, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Warren, LMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Mackenzie, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rashidnasab, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Diaz, OUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dance, DRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Young, KCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bosmans, HUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Strudley, CJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Wells, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 7 August 2014
Identification Number : 10.1088/0031-9155/59/15/4275
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 13:11
Last Modified : 31 Oct 2017 16:50
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805813

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