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Mathematical models for sleep-wake dynamics: comparison of the two-process model and a mutual inhibition neuronal model

Skeldon, AC, Dijk, D-J and Derks, G (2014) Mathematical models for sleep-wake dynamics: comparison of the two-process model and a mutual inhibition neuronal model PLoS One, 9 (8).

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Abstract

Sleep is essential for the maintenance of human life, yet many features of sleep are poorly understood and mathematical models are an important tool for probing proposed biological mechanisms. The most well-known mathematical model of sleep regulation, the two-process model, models the sleep-wake cycle by two oscillators: a circadian oscillator and a homeostatic oscillator. An alternative, more recent, model considers the reciprocal interaction of sleep promoting neurons and the ascending arousal system regulated by homeostatic and circadian processes. Here we show there are fundamental similarities between these two models. The implications are illustrated with two important sleep-wake phenomena. Firstly, we show that in the two-process model, transitions between different numbers of daily sleep episodes can be classified as grazing bifurcations. This provides the theoretical underpinning for numerical results showing that the sleep patterns of many mammals can be explained by the reciprocal interaction model. Secondly, we show that when sleep deprivation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, ostensibly different measures of sleepiness in the two models are closely related. The demonstration of the mathematical similarities of the two models is important because not only does it it allow some features of the two-process model to be interpreted physiologically but it also means that knowledge gained from the study of the two-process model can be used to inform understanding of the behaviour of the mutual inhibition model. This is important because the mutual inhibition model and its extensions are increasingly being used as a tool to understand a diverse range of sleep-wake phenomena sucah as the design of optimal shift-patterns, yet the values it uses for the parameters associated with the circadian and homeostatic processes are very different from those that have been experimentally measured in the context of the two-process model

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Mathematics
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Skeldon, ACUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dijk, D-JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Derks, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 August 2014
Identification Number : 10.1371/journal.pone.0103877
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Copyright: © 2014 Skeldon et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 17 Mar 2015 16:18
Last Modified : 22 Apr 2015 13:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805623

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