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When Differences Become Unimportant: Casshern and the true social of cyberpunk

Poulaki, M (2010) When Differences Become Unimportant: Casshern and the true social of cyberpunk In: Humanity in Cybernetic Environments. Critical Issues. Imaginative research in a changing world . Inter-disciplinary Press, Oxford, pp. 125-134. ISBN 978-1-904710-71-4

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Abstract

Through a combination of actor-network theory’s anti-essentialism and Badiou’s ethics, this article seeks to explore what cyberpunk can mean today, using the film Casshern as a case study. For Latour, the path to the social as an event, opens only when no pre-given abstract categories as ‘nature’ and ‘society’ enclave human action. Technological and biological, human and nonhuman actors or actants, both can co-exist and co-work to make the social, as the difference between the natural and the technological is rendered unimportant. Badiou’s universal ethics also begin when differences between self and other become unimportant. In this sense, cuberpunk, rendering the human-nonhuman difference unimportant, can be a truly universal genre, indicating that human identity is still a goal to be reached; and this goal does not recognize the ‘human’ as a solid category.

Item Type: Book Section
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > School of Arts
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Poulaki, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2010
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Full text may be available from this repository at a later date.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 26 Jun 2014 10:55
Last Modified : 13 Feb 2015 02:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805494

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