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Identifying public preferences using multi-criteria decision making for assessing the shift of urban commuters from private to public transport: A case study of Delhi

Jain, S, Aggarwal, P, Kumar, P, Singhal, S and Sharma, P (2014) Identifying public preferences using multi-criteria decision making for assessing the shift of urban commuters from private to public transport: A case study of Delhi Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 24. pp. 60-70.

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Abstract

Shifting urban commuters to public transport can be an effective strategy to deal with the energy and environmental problems associated with the transport sector. In order to enhance public transport the mode of choice for urban commuters, public expectations and requirements should be at the centre of the policy-making process. This study uses pair-wise weighing method (i.e. Analytical Hierarchy Process) to derive priorities for different criteria for shifting urban commuters to the public transport system based on their opinion. The primary survey has been conducted to collect the data for identifying public preferences for public transport characteristics under four parent criteria: reliability, comfort, safety and cost, identified based on literature review and expert opinion. This information was collected using questionnaire based surveys between January 2013 and July 2013 from nearly 50 locations using a stratified random sampling technique from nine districts of Delhi. Our results suggest safety as the most important criteria (36% of total) for encouraging the urban commuters to shift from private vehicles to public transport and then reliability (27%), cost (21%) and comfort (16%). Based on above four criteria, commuters were found to be happy with Delhi metro services compared to buses and other mode of public transport due to more frequency, adherence to schedule, less travel time, comfort and safety. Commuters were willing to pay more for better public transport service since the travel cost was not considered to be one of the important criteria. The results also showed that 96% commuters are willing to shift to public transport if above criteria or services are considered for providing an efficient public transport system. These results can assist transport planners to integrate public preferences with the available technical alternatives for the wise allocation of the available resources.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Jain, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Aggarwal, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kumar, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Singhal, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sharma, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : May 2014
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.trf.2014.03.007
Uncontrolled Keywords : Analytical Hierarchy Process, Modal shift, Public transport, Commuter perceptions
Related URLs :
Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 24, May 2014, DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2014.03.007.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 14 May 2014 09:23
Last Modified : 09 Jun 2014 13:58
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805421

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