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Physiological responses to food intake throughout the day

Johnston, Jonathan (2014) Physiological responses to food intake throughout the day NUTRITION RESEARCH REVIEWS, 27 (1). pp. 107-118.

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Abstract

Circadian rhythms act to optimise many aspects of our biology and thereby ensure that physiological processes are occurring at the most appropriate time. The importance of this temporal control is demonstrated by the strong associations between circadian disruption, morbidity and disease pathology. There is now a wealth of evidence linking the circadian timing system to metabolic physiology and nutrition. Relationships between these processes are often reciprocal, such that the circadian system drives temporal changes in metabolic pathways and changes in metabolic/nutritional status alter core molecular components of circadian rhythms. Examples of metabolic rhythms include daily changes in glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity and postprandial response. Time of day alters lipid and glucose profiles following individual meals whereas, over a longer time scale, meal timing regulates adiposity and body weight; these changes may occur via the ability of timed feeding to synchronise local circadian rhythms in metabolically active tissues. Much of the work in this research field has utilised animal and cellular model systems. Although these studies are highly informative and persuasive, there is a largely unmet need to translate basic biological data to humans. The results of such translational studies may open up possibilities for using timed dietary manipulations to help restore circadian synchrony and downstream physiology. Given the large number of individuals with disrupted rhythms due to, for example, shift work, jet-lag, sleep disorders and blindness, such dietary manipulations could provide widespread improvements in health and also economic performance.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Biochemical Sciences
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Johnston, JonathanJ.Johnston@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 June 2014
Identification Number : 10.1017/S0954422414000055
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2014 The Authors 2014. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Nutrition & Dietetics, Circadian clock, Metabolism, Breakfast, Night eating syndrome, PERIPHERAL CIRCADIAN CLOCKS, DORSOMEDIAL HYPOTHALAMIC NUCLEUS, FASTING PLASMA-GLUCOSE, MELATONIN RECEPTOR 1B, SIMULATED SHIFT WORK, INTERNAL BODY TIME, REV-ERB-ALPHA, KNOCK-IN MICE, GENE-EXPRESSION, SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 15 Apr 2014 15:41
Last Modified : 27 Jul 2017 10:10
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805396

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