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Hoody, goody or buddy? How travel mode affects social perceptions in urban neighbourhoods

Gatersleben, B, Murtagh, N and White, E (2013) Hoody, goody or buddy? How travel mode affects social perceptions in urban neighbourhoods Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 21. pp. 219-230.

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Abstract

When travelling through a new environment people can and do make very quick judgements about the local conditions. This paper explores the idea that such judgements are affected by the travel mode they use. We hypothesise that drivers generate a more superficial impression of the things they observe than those who walk because they are exposed to less information. This prediction is based on social psychological research that demonstrates that information that becomes available in "thin slices" affects superficial judgements. A survey study (n = 644) demonstrated that perceptions of a less affluent area are indeed negatively related to more driving and positively related to more walking, but only for those who do not live there. Perceptions of a neighbouring affluent area are positively related to more driving. Two experimental studies (n = 245 and n = 91) demonstrated that explicit (but not implicit) attitudes towards a group of young people in an ambiguous social situation are more negative when they are viewed from the perspective of a car user in particular in relation to a pedestrian perspective. These findings suggest that mode use may affect communities by influencing social judgements. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Gatersleben, BUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Murtagh, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
White, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : November 2013
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.trf.2013.09.005
Related URLs :
Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, Vol 21, November 2013, DOI 10.1016/j.trf.2013.09.005.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 27 Jan 2015 14:14
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2015 14:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805376

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