University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Greater seasonal cycling of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased parathyroid hormone and bone resorption

Darling, AL, Hart, KH, Gibbs, MA, Lanham-New, SA, Gossiel, F, Eastell, R, Kantermann, T, Horton, K, Johnsen, S, Berry, JL, Skene, DJ and Vieth, R (2014) Greater seasonal cycling of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased parathyroid hormone and bone resorption Osteoporosis International, 25 (3). pp. 933-941.

[img]
Preview
Text
VitaminDCyclingPaperOI(19)AUTHOR_FINAL_SUBMITTED_VERSION.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (512kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (33kB) | Preview

Abstract

This analysis assessed whether seasonal change in 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was associated with bone resorption, as evidenced by serum parathyroid hormone and C-terminal telopeptide concentrations. The main finding was that increased seasonal fluctuation in 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with increased levels of parathyroid hormone and C-terminal telopeptide. Introduction: It is established that adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D, vitamin D) concentration is required for healthy bone mineralisation. It is unknown whether seasonal fluctuations in 25(OH)D also impact on bone health. If large seasonal fluctuations in 25(OH)D were associated with increased bone resorption, this would suggest a detriment to bone health. Therefore, this analysis assessed whether there is an association between seasonal variation in 25(OH)D and bone resorption. Methods: The participants were (n = 279) Caucasian and (n = 88) South Asian women (mean (±SD); age 48.2 years (14.4)) who participated in the longitudinal Diet, Food Intake, Nutrition and Exposure to the Sun in Southern England study (2006-2007). The main outcomes were serum 25(OH)D, serum parathyroid hormone (sPTH) and serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen (sCTX), sampled once per season for each participant. Results: Non-linear mixed modelling showed the (amplitude/mesor) ratio for seasonal change in log 25(OH)D to be predictive of log sPTH (estimate = 0.057, 95 % CI (0.051, 0.063), p < 0.0001). Therefore, individuals with a higher seasonal change in log 25(OH)D, adjusted for overall log 25(OH)D concentration, showed increased levels of log sPTH. There was a corresponding significant ability to predict the range of seasonal change in log 25(OH)D through the level of sCTX. Here, the corresponding parameter statistics were estimate = 0.528, 95 % CI (0.418, 0.638) and p ≤ 0.0001. Conclusions: These findings suggest a possible detriment to bone health via increased levels of sPTH and sCTX in individuals with a larger seasonal change in 25(OH)D concentration. Further larger cohort studies are required to further investigate these preliminary findings. © 2013 International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Darling, ALUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Hart, KHUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gibbs, MAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lanham-New, SAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Gossiel, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Eastell, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kantermann, TUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Horton, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Johnsen, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Berry, JLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Skene, DJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Vieth, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : March 2014
Identification Number : 10.1007/s00198-013-2493-4
Additional Information : The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-013-2493-4
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 27 Aug 2014 14:25
Last Modified : 01 Mar 2015 02:08
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/805310

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800