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Observed Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction in scale testing of Offshore Wind Turbine Foundations

Bhattacharya, Subhamoy (2013) Observed Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction in scale testing of Offshore Wind Turbine Foundations Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, 54. pp. 47-60.

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Abstract

Monopile foundations have been commonly used to support offshore wind turbine generators (WTGs), but this type of foundation encounters economic and technical limitations for larger WTGs in water depths exceeding 30m. Offshore wind farm projects are increasingly turning to alternative multipod foundations (for example tetrapod, jacket and tripods) supported on shallow foundations to reduce the environmental effects of piling noise. However the characteristics of these foundations under dynamic loading or long term cyclic wind turbine loading are not fully understood. This paper summarises the results from a series of small scaled tests (1:100, 1:150 and 1:200) of a NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) on three types of foundations: monopiles, symmetric tetrapod and asymmetric tripod. The test bed used consists of either kaolin clay or sand and up to 1.4 million loading cycles were applied. The results showed that the multipod foundations (symmetric or asymmetric) exhibit two closely spaced natural frequencies corresponding to the rocking modes of vibration in two principle axes. Furthermore, the corresponding two spectral peaks change with repeated cycles of loading and they converge for symmetric tetrapods but not for asymmetric tripods. From the fatigue design point of view, the two peaks for multipod foundations broaden the range of frequencies that can be excited by the broadband nature of the environmental loading (wind and wave) thereby impacting the fatigue. The system life (number of cycles to failure) may effectively increase for symmetric foundations as the two peaks will tend to converge. However, for asymmetric foundations the system life may continue to be affected adversely as the two peaks will not converge. In this sense, designers should prefer symmetric foundations to asymmetric foundations.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Bhattacharya, Subhamoys.bhattacharya@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 3 September 2013
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.soildyn.2013.07.012
Copyright Disclaimer : © 2013. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords : Dynamics, Soil-structure Interaction, Offshore Wind Turbines, Frequency
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 26 Jul 2017 09:32
Last Modified : 26 Jul 2017 09:32
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/802380

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