University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Factors associated with pregnancy and sti among Aboriginal students in British Columbia

Devries, KM, Free, CJ, Morison, L and Saewyc, E (2009) Factors associated with pregnancy and sti among Aboriginal students in British Columbia Canadian Journal of Public Health, 100 (3). pp. 226-230.

[img]
Preview
Text (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf

Download (33kB)
[img] Text (deleted)
Devries et al Am J Public Health word version.docx
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (77kB)
[img] Text
can j pub health word version.docx
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (178kB)
[img]
Preview
Text
Factors associated with pregnancy.pdf

Download (181kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Aboriginal adolescents are more likely to become pregnant and contract an STI than other Canadian adolescents. This study provides some of the first data on factors associated with these outcomes among Aboriginal adolescents. Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted using 2003 data from a large cross-sectional survey of British Columbia secondary school students. 445 young women and 360 young men who identified as Aboriginal and reported ever having sex were included in analyses. Associations between selfreported pregnancy and STI and 11 exposure variables were examined using logistic regression. Results: Of young women, 10.6% reported a pregnancy; 10.5% of young men reported causing a pregnancy. An STI diagnosis was reported by 4.2% of young women and 3.9% of young men. In multivariate analyses for young men, ever having been sexually abused was the strongest consistent risk factor for causing a pregnancy (AOR=4.30, 95% CI 1.64-11.25) and STI diagnosis (AOR=5.58, 95% CI 1.61-19.37). For young women, abuse was associated with increased odds of pregnancy (AOR=10.37, 95% CI 4.04-26.60) but not STI. Among young women, substance use was the strongest consistent risk factor for both pregnancy (AOR=3.36, 95% CI 1.25-9.08) and STI (AOR=5.27, 95% CI 1.50-18.42); for young men, substance use was associated with higher odds of STI (AOR=4.60, 95% CI 1.11-19.14). Factors associated with decreased risk included community, school and family involvement. Conclusions: Health care professionals, communities and policy-makers must urgently address sexual abuse and substance use. Exploring promotion of school and community involvement and family cohesion may be useful for sexual health interventions with Aboriginal students.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Devries, KMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Free, CJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Morison, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Saewyc, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : May 2009
Additional Information : © Canadian Public Health Association, 2009. All rights reserved.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 22 May 2015 11:43
Last Modified : 22 May 2015 11:43
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/800153

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800