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Large-area patterning of the tackiness of a nanocomposite adhesive by sintering of nanoparticles under IR radiation.

Gurney, RS, Dupin, D, Siband, E, Ouzineb, K and Keddie, JL (2013) Large-area patterning of the tackiness of a nanocomposite adhesive by sintering of nanoparticles under IR radiation. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces, 5 (6). pp. 2137-2145.

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Abstract

We present a simple technique to switch off the tack adhesion in selected areas of a colloidal nanocomposite adhesive. It is made from a blend of soft colloidal polymer particles and hard copolymer nanoparticles. In regions that are exposed to IR radiation, the nanoparticles sinter together to form a percolating skeleton, which hardens and stiffens the adhesive. The tack adhesion is lost locally. Masks can be made from silicone-coated disks, such as coins. Under the masks, adhesive island regions are defined with the surrounding regions being a nontacky coating. When optimizing the nanocomposite's adhesive properties, the addition of the hard nanoparticles raises the elastic modulus of the adhesive significantly, but adhesion is not lost because the yield point remains relatively low. During probe-tack testing, the soft polymer phases yield and enable fibrillation. After heating under IR radiation, the storage modulus increases by a factor of 5, and the yield point increases nearly by a factor of 6, such that yielding and fibrillation do not occur in the probe-tack testing. Hence, the adhesion is lost. Loading and unloading experiments indicate that a rigid skeleton is created when the nanoparticles sinter together, and it fractures under moderate strains. This patterning method is relatively simple and fast to execute. It is widely applicable to other blends of thermoplastic hard nanoparticles and larger soft particles.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Physics
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Gurney, RSUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Dupin, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Siband, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Ouzineb, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Keddie, JLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : March 2013
Identification Number : 10.1021/am303184k
Related URLs :
Additional Information : This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Appl Mater Interfaces, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher.To access the final edited and published work see http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/am303184k.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 10 Jul 2013 13:26
Last Modified : 26 Nov 2014 14:14
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/775077

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