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Adolescents with Anxiety and Depression: Is Social Recovery Relevant?

Simonds, LM, Pons, RA, Stone, NJ, Warren, F and John, M (2014) Adolescents with Anxiety and Depression: Is Social Recovery Relevant? Clin Psychol Psychother, 21 (4). pp. 289-298.

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Abstract

Social recovery has become a prominent aspect of mental health service design and delivery in the past decade. Much of the literature on social recovery is derived from first-person accounts or primary research with adult service users experiencing severe mental illness. There is a lack of both theoretical and empirical work that could inform consideration of how the concept of social recovery might apply to adolescents experiencing common (non-psychotic) mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. The current study was conducted to understand the process of experiencing anxiety and depression in young people. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine adolescents with anxiety and depression (seven girls and two boys aged 14-16 years) and 12 mothers who were recruited from a specialist Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in the South of England. Thematic analysis indicated that young people do experience a process of 'recovery'; the processes participants described have some congruence with the earlier stages of adult recovery models involving biographical disruption and the development of new meanings, in this case of anxiety or depression, and changes in sense of identity. The accounts diverge with regard to later stages of adult models involving the development of hope and responsibility. The findings suggest that services should attend to social isolation and emphasise support for positive aspirations for future selves whilst also attending to young people's and parents' expectations about change. Methodological challenges face enquiry about 'recovery' given its connotations with cure in everyday language. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEY PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: Theoretical and empirical work on social recovery in young people and families is lacking. Using interviews, this study sought to understand the relevance of social recovery for adolescents with anxiety and depression and their mothers. Findings suggest some congruence with the earlier stages of adult recovery models involving meaning and identity. Findings diverge with regard to later stages of adult recovery models involving hope and responsibility. Social recovery in mental health services for young people needs significant empirical attention and critical debate.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Simonds, LMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Pons, RAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Stone, NJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Warren, FUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
John, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 July 2014
Identification Number : 10.1002/cpp.1841
Related URLs :
Additional Information : This is the accepted version of the following article: Simonds LM, Pons RA, Stone NJ, Warren F, John M. (2013) Adolescents with Anxiety and Depression: Is Social Recovery Relevant? Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cpp.1841
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 11 Jun 2014 10:56
Last Modified : 21 Nov 2014 14:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/773226

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