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Reconceptualizing hate crime victimization through the lens of vulnerability and 'difference'

Chakraborti, N and Garland, J (2012) Reconceptualizing hate crime victimization through the lens of vulnerability and 'difference' Theoretical Criminology, 16 (4). pp. 499-514.

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This article suggests that the concepts of vulnerability and ‘difference’ should be focal points of hate crime scholarship if the values at the heart of the hate crime movement are not to be diluted. By stringently associating hate crime with particular strands of victims and sets of motivations through singular constructions of identity, criminologists have created a divisive and hierarchical approach to understanding hate crime. To counter these limitations, we propose that vulnerability and ‘difference’, rather than identity and group membership alone, should be central to investigations of hate crime. These concepts would allow for a more inclusive conceptual framework enabling hitherto overlooked and vulnerable victims of targeted violence to receive the recognition they urgently need.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences > Department of Sociology
Authors :
Date : 1 November 2012
Identification Number : 10.1177/1362480612439432
Uncontrolled Keywords : Social Sciences, Criminology & Penology, 'Difference', hate crime, identity, victimization, vulnerability, IDENTITY, VIOLENCE
Related URLs :
Additional Information : Published in Theoretical Criminology 16 (4), 2012. Copyright 2012 Sage Publications.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 10 Jul 2013 16:47
Last Modified : 23 Sep 2013 20:08

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