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Weighing the prospects of war

Pratto, F, Glasford, DE and Hegarty, P (2006) Weighing the prospects of war Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 9 (2). pp. 219-233.

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Prospect theory (Kahneman & Tversky, 1979) predictions were examined in light of ethnocentrism and intergroup conflict. An experiment conducted at the outset of the 2003 invasion of Iraq by the US, UK and their allies explored American and British participants' preferences for certain versus uncertain gains and losses concerning Iraqi, American, and British lives. In four conditions, participants showed the usual loss-aversion when deciding between options that only affected Iraqi lives. Six other conditions examined choices between the lives of Americans, Britons, or Iraqis. Strong ethnocentric biases rather than risk-aversion occurred. Participants preferred policies that prioritized their own nationals' and allies' lives over Iraqi lives. War-related and other attitudes corresponded to participants' decisions. The need to expand prospect theory to address intergroup relations is discussed.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
Date : 2006
Uncontrolled Keywords : decision-making; intergroup relations; prejudice international-relations; decision; choice; context; risky; bias
Additional Information : Published in Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 9 (2) 2006. Copyright 2006 Sage Publications.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 18 Jul 2014 09:54
Last Modified : 18 Jul 2014 13:33

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