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Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour to weight control in an overweight cohort. Results from a pan-European dietary intervention trial (DiOGenes).

McConnon, A, Raats, MM, Astrup, A, Bajzová, M, Handjieva-Darlenska, T, Lindroos, AK, Martinez, JA, Larson, TM, Papadaki, A, Pfeiffer, A, van Baak, MA and Shepherd, R (2011) Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour to weight control in an overweight cohort. Results from a pan-European dietary intervention trial (DiOGenes). Appetite, 58 (1). pp. 313-318.

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McConnon (2012) Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour to weight control in an overweight cohort. results from a pan-European dietary intervention trial (DiOGenes). Appetite.pdf - Accepted version Manuscript
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Abstract

Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), this study investigates weight control in overweight and obese participants (27kg/m(2)⩽BMI<45kg/m(2)) taking part in a dietary intervention trial targeted at weight loss maintenance (n=932). Respondents completed TPB measures investigating "weight gain prevention" at three time points. Correlation and regression analyses were used to investigate the relationship between TPB variables and weight regain. The TPB explained up to 27% variance in expectation, 14% in intention and 20% in desire scores. No relationship was established between intention, expectation or desire and behaviour at Time 1 or Time 2. Perceived need and subjective norm were found to be significantly related to weight regain, however, the model explained a maximum of 11% of the variation in weight regain. Better understanding of overweight individuals' trajectories of weight control is needed to help inform studies investigating people's weight regain behaviours. Future research using the TPB model to explain weight control should consider the likely behaviours being sought by individuals.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Psychology
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
McConnon, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Raats, MMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Astrup, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bajzová, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Handjieva-Darlenska, TUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Lindroos, AKUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Martinez, JAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Larson, TMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Papadaki, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Pfeiffer, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
van Baak, MAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Shepherd, RUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 3 November 2011
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.appet.2011.10.017
Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Appetite. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Appetite, 58 (1), November 2011, DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2011.10.017.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 27 Mar 2014 14:38
Last Modified : 09 Jun 2014 13:41
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/763998

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