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Is sedentary behaviour associated with dietary intake in young people? A systematic review.

Biddle, S, Pearson, N and Raats, MM Is sedentary behaviour associated with dietary intake in young people? A systematic review. In: 2010 Annual Conference of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA, 2010-06-09 - 2010-06-12, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

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Abstract

Purpose: To review associations between sedentary behaviours and dietary intake in young people. Background: Although an association has been shown between television viewing (TV) and body fatness in young people, factors that mediate this relationship are less clear. While engaging in sedentary behaviours such as TV viewing, increased opportunities to eat snacks and exposure to food advertisements may influence food intake. The interaction of sedentary behaviour and dietary intake may contribute to a positive energy balance. A greater understanding of the associations between sedentary behaviour and dietary intake in young people will provide an important step towards developing effective interventions for the prevention of obesity. Methods: Published English language studies were located from computerised and manual searches. Observational research reporting a measure of dietary intake and data on at least one sedentary behaviour were included. Conclusions: Cross-sectionally (n=27 studies), TV viewing was negatively associated with fruit and vegetable consumption, and positively associated with consumption of energy-dense snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages, and with total energy intake and percentage of energy from fat. Longitudinally (n=7 studies), changes in TV viewing were negatively associated with changes in fruit and vegetable consumption, and positively associated with changes in consumption of energy-dense snacks and sugar-sweetened beverages, and changes in total energy intake. TV viewing is associated with poor dietary behaviour in young people and may partly account for the association between TV viewing and weight status.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (UNSPECIFIED)
Divisions : Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Biddle, SUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Pearson, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Raats, MMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 15:27
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2017 15:27
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/763162

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