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Techno-economic analysis of polygeneration systems with carbon capture and storage and CO reuse

Ng, KS, Zhang, N and Sadhukhan, J (2013) Techno-economic analysis of polygeneration systems with carbon capture and storage and CO reuse Chemical Engineering Journal, 219. pp. 96-108.

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Abstract

Several decarbonised polygeneration schemes exploiting carbon capture and storage (CCS) or CO reuse technologies for the generation of clean fuels, chemicals, electricity and heat have been systematically analysed for techno-economic feasibility. Process simulation, energy integration and economic analysis were undertaken to analyse the effect of process configurations and operating conditions on the economic potential (EP) and risks. CO capture and reuse producing methane using Sabatier's reaction shows less favourable economics compared to the counterpart CCS based scheme, both producing electricity, hydrogen, acetic acid and methanol in common. Post-combustion CO tri-reforming into methanol production in addition to electricity generation shows overall favourable economics compared to the counterpart integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) with CCS scheme. Thus, increasing product portfolio from energy products in a cogeneration plant to chemical products evolved from thermodynamic and process integration synergies increases the techno-economic viability. Bio-oil can be processed as an alternative low carbon feedstock. While bio-oil creates environmental incentives, its economic competitiveness can be enhanced by introducing credits on product prices. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Centre for Environmental Strategy
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Ng, KSUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Zhang, NUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Sadhukhan, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 1 March 2013
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.cej.2012.12.082
Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Chemical Engineering Journal. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Chemical Engineering Journal, 219, March 2013, DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2012.12.082.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 22 Mar 2013 10:08
Last Modified : 23 Sep 2013 20:02
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/761499

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