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Effects of night work on sleep, cortisol and mood of female nurses, their husbands and children

Lowson, E, Middleton, Benita, Arber, Sara and Skene, Debra (2013) Effects of night work on sleep, cortisol and mood of female nurses, their husbands and children Sleep and Biological Rhythms, 11 (1). pp. 7-13.

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Abstract

Negative impacts of night work on employees are well documented, but little is known about immediate consequences for family members. This study examines how night work within a rotating shift pattern affects the sleep, mood and cortisol levels of female nurses, their husbands and children. Participants included twenty nurses (42.7 ± 6.5 years), their husbands and children (n=34, 8-18 years) who completed sleep diaries, rated their sleep quality, alertness and mood daily, and collected saliva samples each morning and evening for 14 days. Comparisons were made between night work and other shifts (Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test); and between periods preceding, during and following night shifts (repeated measures ANOVA with Tukey posthoc tests). Nurses’ sleep after the final night shift was significantly shorter (3h 58 mins ± 46 mins) and ended significantly earlier (13:28 ± 0:48h) than after the first night shift (sleep duration 5h 17 mins ± 1h 36 mins; wake time 14:58 ± 1:41h) (p<0.05, n=16). Nurses felt significantly more sleepy with worse mood during night work compared to periods without night work. Bedtime for pre-teenage children (n=15) was significantly later when mothers were working night shifts. Teenage children (n=19) felt significantly calmer when their mothers were working night shifts. This study found significant negative impacts of night shifts on nurses. Despite some changes to children’s sleep and mood, most parameters were unaffected. There was an absence of changes to husbands’ sleep and mood. This suggests nurses’ night work has minimal impacts on family members participating in our study.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
NameEmailORCID
Lowson, EUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Middleton, BenitaB.Middleton@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Arber, SaraS.Arber@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Skene, DebraD.Skene@surrey.ac.ukUNSPECIFIED
Date : 18 January 2013
Identification Number : 10.1111/j.1479-8425.2012.00585.x
Copyright Disclaimer : This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Lowson, E., Middleton, B., Arber, S. and Skene, D. J. (2013), Effects of night work on sleep, cortisol and mood of female nurses, their husbands and children. Sleep and Biological Rhythms, 11: 7–13. doi:10.1111/j.1479-8425.2012.00585.x, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1479-8425.2012.00585.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving
Related URLs :
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 27 Jun 2017 07:53
Last Modified : 04 Jul 2017 07:38
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/761385

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