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Micro/nanopatterning of proteins via contact printing using high aspect ratio PMMA stamps and nanoimprint apparatus.

Pla-Roca, M, Fernandez, JG, Mills, CA, Martínez, E and Samitier, J (2007) Micro/nanopatterning of proteins via contact printing using high aspect ratio PMMA stamps and nanoimprint apparatus. Langmuir, 23 (16). pp. 8614-8618.

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Micro- and nanoscale protein patterns have been produced via a new contact printing method using a nanoimprint lithography apparatus. The main novelty of the technique is the use of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) instead of the commonly used poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps. This avoids printing problems due to roof collapse, which limits the usable aspect ratio in microcontact printing to 10:1. The rigidity of the PMMA allows protein patterning using stamps with very high aspect ratios, up to 300 in this case. Conformal contact between the stamp and the substrate is achieved because of the homogeneous pressure applied via the nanoimprint lithography instrument, and it has allowed us to print lines of protein approximately 150 nm wide, at a 400 nm period. This technique, therefore, provides an excellent method for the direct printing of high-density sub-micrometer scale patterns, or, alternatively, micro-/nanopatterns spaced at large distances. The controlled production of these protein patterns is a key factor in biomedical applications such as cell-surface interaction experiments and tissue engineering.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering > Advanced Technology Institute > Nano-Electronics Centre
Authors :
Date : 31 July 2007
Identification Number : 10.1021/la700572r
Uncontrolled Keywords : Dimethylpolysiloxanes, Nylons, Polymethyl Methacrylate, Proteins, Tissue Engineering
Related URLs :
Additional Information : This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in LANGMUIR, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher.To access the final edited and published work see
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 08 Mar 2013 11:12
Last Modified : 23 Sep 2013 20:00

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