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Decrease of D-2 receptor binding but increase in D-2-stimulated G-protein activation, dopamine transporter binding and behavioural sensitization in brains of mice treated with a chronic escalating dose 'binge' cocaine administration paradigm

Bailey, A, Metaxas, A, Yoo, JH, McGee, T and Kitchen, I (2008) Decrease of D-2 receptor binding but increase in D-2-stimulated G-protein activation, dopamine transporter binding and behavioural sensitization in brains of mice treated with a chronic escalating dose 'binge' cocaine administration paradigm EUR J NEUROSCI, 28 (4). 759 - 770. ISSN 0953-816X

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Abstract

Understanding the neurobiology of the transition from initial drug use to excessive drug use has been a challenge in drug addiction. We examined the effect of chronic 'binge' escalating dose cocaine administration, which mimics human compulsive drug use, on behavioural responses and the dopaminergic system of mice and compared it with a chronic steady dose (3 x 15 mg/kg/day) 'binge' cocaine administration paradigm. Male C57BL/6J mice were injected with saline or cocaine in an escalating dose paradigm for 14 days. Locomotor and stereotypy activity were measured and quantitative autoradiographic mapping of D(1) and D(2) receptors, dopamine transporters and D(2)-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding was performed in the brains of mice treated with this escalating and steady dose paradigm. An initial sensitization to the locomotor effects of cocaine followed by a dose-dependent increase in the duration of the locomotor effect of cocaine was observed in the escalating but not the steady dose paradigm. Sensitization to the stereotypy effect of cocaine and an increase in cocaine-induced stereotypy score was observed from 3 x 20 to 3 x 25 mg/kg/day cocaine. There was a significant decrease in D(2) receptor density, but an increase in D(2)-stimulated G-protein activity and dopamine transporter density in the striatum of cocaine-treated mice, which was not observed in our steady dose paradigm. Our results document that chronic 'binge' escalating dose cocaine treatment triggers profound behavioural and neurochemical changes in the dopaminergic system, which might underlie the transition from drug use to compulsive drug use associated with addiction, which is a process of escalation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The definitive version is available at wileyonlinelibrary.com.
Uncontrolled Keywords: [S-35]GTP gamma S, autoradiography, locomotion, stereotypy, POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY, KAPPA-OPIOID RECEPTORS, RAT NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS, MESSENGER-RNA LEVELS, UP-REGULATION, QUANTITATIVE AUTORADIOGRAPHY, STRIATAL PREPRODYNORPHIN, NEUROCHEMICAL CHANGES, RHESUS-MONKEYS, KNOCKOUT MICE
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > Biochemistry and Physiology
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2011 11:31
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 18:48
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/7456

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