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Visualising the invisible: A network approach to reveal the informal social side of student learning

Hommes, J, de Grave, W, Bos, G, Schuwirth, L, Scherpbier, A and Rienties, B (2012) Visualising the invisible: A network approach to reveal the informal social side of student learning Advances in Health Sciences Education, 17 (5). pp. 743-757.

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Abstract

World-wide, universities in health sciences have transformed their curriculum to include collaborative learning and facilitate the students' learning process. Interaction has been acknowledged to be the synergistic element in this learning context. However, students spend the majority of their time outside their classroom and interaction does not stop outside the classroom. Therefore we studied how informal social interaction influences student learning. Moreover, to explore what really matters in the students learning process, a model was tested how the generally known important constructs-prior performance, motivation and social integration-relate to informal social interaction and student learning. 301 undergraduate medical students participated in this cross-sectional quantitative study. Informal social interaction was assessed using self-reported surveys following the network approach. Students' individual motivation, social integration and prior performance were assessed by the Academic Motivation Scale, the College Adaption Questionnaire and students' GPA respectively. A factual knowledge test represented student' learning. All social networks were positively associated with student learning significantly: friendships (β = 0.11), providing information to other students (β = 0.16), receiving information from other students (β = 0.25). Structural equation modelling revealed a model in which social networks increased student learning (r = 0.43), followed by prior performance (r = 0.31). In contrast to prior literature, students' academic motivation and social integration were not associated with students' learning. Students' informal social interaction is strongly associated with students' learning. These findings underline the need to change our focus from the formal context (classroom) to the informal context to optimize student learning and deliver modern medics. © 2012 The Author(s).

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Department of Higher Education
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Hommes, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
de Grave, WUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bos, GUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Schuwirth, LUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Scherpbier, AUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Rienties, BUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : November 2012
Identification Number : 10.1007/s10459-012-9349-0
Additional Information : Article published under the Creative Commons Attribution license, which allows users to read, copy, distribute and make derivative works, as long as the author of the original work is cited.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 31 Jan 2013 13:05
Last Modified : 23 Sep 2013 19:58
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/745579

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