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Speech and language therapy intervention with a group of persistent and prolific young offenders in a non-custodial setting with previously undiagnosed speech, language and communication difficulties.

Gregory, J and Bryan, K (2011) Speech and language therapy intervention with a group of persistent and prolific young offenders in a non-custodial setting with previously undiagnosed speech, language and communication difficulties. Int J Lang Commun Disord, 46 (2). pp. 202-215.

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Abstract

Background: Increasing numbers of children with behaviour and school problems (related to both academic achievement and social participation) are recognized as having undiagnosed speech, language and communication difficulties. Both speech, language and communication difficulties and school failure are risk factors for offending. Aims: To investigate the prevalence of speech, language and communication difficulties in a group of persistent and prolific young offenders sentenced to the Intensive Supervision and Surveillance Programme (ISSP), and to provide a preliminary evaluation of the impact of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention. Methods & Procedures: Seventy-two entrants to ISSP over 12 months were screened by the speech and language therapist. Those showing difficulties then had a detailed language assessment followed by intervention delivered jointly by the speech and language therapist and the youth offending team staff. Reassessment occurred at programme completion. Outcomes & Results: A total of 65% of those screened had profiles indicating that they had language difficulties and might benefit from speech and language therapy intervention. As a cohort, their language skills were lower than those of the general population, and 20% scored at the 'severely delayed' level on standardized assessment. This is the first study of speech and language therapy within community services for young offenders, and is the first to demonstrate language improvement detectable on standardized language tests. However, further research is needed to determine the precise role of speech and language therapy within the intervention programme. Conclusions & Implications: Children and young people with behavioural or school difficulties coming into contact with criminal justice, mental health, psychiatric, and social care services need to be systematically assessed for undiagnosed speech, language and communication difficulties. Appropriate interventions can then enable the young person to engage with verbally mediated interventions.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Gregory, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bryan, KUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : March 2011
Identification Number : 10.3109/13682822.2010.490573
Additional Information : This is an electronic version of an article published in International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 46 (2), 202-215, 2011. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders is available online at: http://informahealthcare.com/loi/lcd
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 13 Dec 2012 13:23
Last Modified : 23 Sep 2013 18:47
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/7415

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