University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Lactobacilli Antagonize the Growth, Motility, and Adherence of Brachyspira pilosicoli: a Potential Intervention against Avian Intestinal Spirochetosis.

Mappley, LJ, Tchórzewska, MA, Cooley, WA, Woodward, MJ and La Ragione, RM (2011) Lactobacilli Antagonize the Growth, Motility, and Adherence of Brachyspira pilosicoli: a Potential Intervention against Avian Intestinal Spirochetosis. Appl Environ Microbiol, 77 (15). pp. 5402-5411.

[img] PDF
Brachy.pdf
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (1MB)
[img] Plain Text (licence)
licence.txt
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (1kB)

Abstract

Avian intestinal spirochetosis (AIS) results from the colonization of the ceca and colorectum of poultry by pathogenic Brachyspira species. The number of cases of AIS has increased since the 2006 European Union ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters, which, together with emerging antimicrobial resistance in Brachyspira, has driven renewed interest in alternative intervention strategies. Probiotics have been reported as protecting livestock against infection with common enteric pathogens, and here we investigate which aspects of the biology of Brachyspira they antagonize in order to identify possible interventions against AIS. The cell-free supernatants (CFS) of two Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus reuteri LM1 and Lactobacillus salivarius LM2, suppressed the growth of Brachyspira pilosicoli B2904 in a pH-dependent manner. In in vitro adherence and invasion assays with HT29-16E three-dimensional (3D) cells and in a novel avian cecal in vitro organ culture (IVOC) model, the adherence and invasion of B. pilosicoli in epithelial cells were reduced significantly by the presence of lactobacilli (P < 0.001). In addition, live and heat-inactivated lactobacilli inhibited the motility of B. pilosicoli, and electron microscopic observations indicated that contact between the lactobacilli and Brachyspira was crucial in inhibiting both adherence and motility. These data suggest that motility is essential for B. pilosicoli to adhere to and invade the gut epithelium and that any interference of motility may be a useful tool for the development of control strategies.

Item Type: Article
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Mappley, LJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Tchórzewska, MAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Cooley, WAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Woodward, MJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
La Ragione, RMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : August 2011
Identification Number : https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00185-11
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 28 Mar 2017 14:58
Last Modified : 28 Mar 2017 14:58
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/7408

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800