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The effect of object speed and direction on the performance of 3D speckle tracking using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe.

Harris, EJ, Miller, NR, Bamber, JC, Symonds-Tayler, JR and Evans, PM (2011) The effect of object speed and direction on the performance of 3D speckle tracking using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe. Phys Med Biol, 56 (22). pp. 7127-7143.

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Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue tracking using 3D ultrasound is of interest for monitoring organ motion during therapy. Previously we demonstrated feature tracking of respiration-induced liver motion in vivo using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe. The aim of this study was to investigate how object speed affects the accuracy of tracking ultrasonic speckle in the absence of any structural information, which mimics the situation in homogenous tissue for motion in the azimuthal and elevational directions. For object motion prograde and retrograde to the sweep direction of the transducer, the spatial sampling frequency increases or decreases with object speed, respectively. We examined the effect object motion direction of the transducer on tracking accuracy. We imaged a homogenous ultrasound speckle phantom whilst moving the probe with linear motion at a speed of 0-35 mm s⁻¹. Tracking accuracy and precision were investigated as a function of speed, depth and direction of motion for fixed displacements of 2 and 4 mm. For the azimuthal direction, accuracy was better than 0.1 and 0.15 mm for displacements of 2 and 4 mm, respectively. For a 2 mm displacement in the elevational direction, accuracy was better than 0.5 mm for most speeds. For 4 mm elevational displacement with retrograde motion, accuracy and precision reduced with speed and tracking failure was observed at speeds of greater than 14 mm s⁻¹. Tracking failure was attributed to speckle de-correlation as a result of decreasing spatial sampling frequency with increasing speed of retrograde motion. For prograde motion, tracking failure was not observed. For inter-volume displacements greater than 2 mm, only prograde motion should be tracked which will decrease temporal resolution by a factor of 2. Tracking errors of the order of 0.5 mm for prograde motion in the elevational direction indicates that using the swept probe technology speckle tracking accuracy is currently too poor to track homogenous tissue over a series of volume images as these errors will accumulate. Improvements could be made through increased spatial sampling in the elevational direction.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering > Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Harris, EJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Miller, NRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bamber, JCUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Symonds-Tayler, JRUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Evans, PMUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 21 November 2011
Identification Number : 10.1088/0031-9155/56/22/009
Uncontrolled Keywords : Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Motion, Phantoms, Imaging, Respiration, Sensitivity and Specificity, Transducers, Ultrasonography
Additional Information : Copyright 2011 Institute of Physics. This is the author's accepted manuscript.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 05 Feb 2013 10:17
Last Modified : 23 Sep 2013 19:53
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/738728

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