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Surface characterisation of PET modified using a p-DC or HIPIMS reactive sputter pre-treatment

Hinder, SJ, Baker, MA, Audronis, M, Bellido-Gonzalez, V and MacK, P (2012) Surface characterisation of PET modified using a p-DC or HIPIMS reactive sputter pre-treatment Surface and Interface Analysis, 44 (8). pp. 1063-1067.

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Abstract

Surface-sensitive techniques have been employed to characterise a model polymer substrate surface, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), after a reactive sputter pre-treatment using magnetically enhanced Cu or Ti sputter targets in a mixed Ar-O glow discharge plasma. The plasmas are produced using either medium-frequency pulsed direct current (p-DC) or low-frequency high power impulse (HIPIMS) sources. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and sessile drop water contact angles were employed to investigate changes in PET surface chemistry and properties following surface modification using different p-DC and HIPIMS process parameters. The XPS results indicate that the chemical composition of plasma-treated PET surfaces (p-DC or HIPIMS) depends strongly on the processing parameters employed such as sputter target material, magnetic array type and power supply technology. XPS results demonstrate that the sputter target material employed is of primary importance as it dictates the quantity of metal deposited/implanted into the PET surface. XPS results show that the use of a Cu target resulted in ∼ 31-35 at.% of Cu incorporated into the PET surface (as CuO), while the use of a Ti target resulted in only 1-4 at. % incorporation (as TiO ). The SIMS spectra and XPS depth profiles of Cu-treated PET indicate that the CuO has formed a discrete film at the surface, offering predominant or total coverage of the underlying PET. However, for Ti-treated PET, both PET and Ti SIMS peaks are observed, and the XPS C1s peak shape is characteristic of PET, indicating that Ti has not formed a discrete film, but instead TiO species have been incorporated, probably as an island-like distribution into the surface of the PET. The formation of CuO and TiO on the PET surface leads to a reduction in the contact angle compared to native PET. Hence, both p-DC and HIPIMS reactive plasma pre-treatments result in a more hydrophilic surface, promoting adhesion and offering a flexible means to introduce a wide range of surface chemistries and properties to polymeric surfaces. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Mechanical Engineering Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Hinder, SJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Baker, MAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Audronis, MUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Bellido-Gonzalez, VUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
MacK, PUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : August 2012
Identification Number : 10.1002/sia.4848
Additional Information : This is the accepted version of the following article: Hinder SJ, Baker MA, Audronis M, Bellido-Gonzalez V, MacK P (2012) Surface characterisation of PET modified using a p-DC or HIPIMS reactive sputter pre-treatment. Surface and Interface Analysis 44(8):1063-1067, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sia.4848/abstract
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 10 Oct 2014 09:06
Last Modified : 31 Jan 2015 02:33
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/738077

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