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The origin of the metal enrichment of carbon nanostructures produced by laser ablation of a carbon-nickel target

Fryar, J, Jayawardena, KDGI, Silva, SRP and Henley, SJ (2012) The origin of the metal enrichment of carbon nanostructures produced by laser ablation of a carbon-nickel target Carbon, 50 (15). pp. 5505-5520.

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Abstract

Compositional analysis of metal-containing carbon thin films and nanostructures produced by pulsed laser ablation of a carbon-nickel target revealed significantly higher fractions of nickel in the materials than in the target used to produce them. Ablation of mixed targets is used routinely in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and to enhance the conductivity of amorphous carbon films by metal incorporation. In this extensive study we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying this metal-enrichment and relate changes in the dynamics of the ablation plumes with increasing background gas pressure to the composition of deposited materials. The failure to preserve the target atom ratios cannot, in this case, be attributed to conventional mechanisms for non-stoichiometric transfer. Instead, nickel-enrichment of the target surface by back-deposition, combined with significantly different propagation dynamics for C atoms, Ni atoms and alloy clusters through the background gas, appears to be the main cause of the high nickel fractions. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering > Advanced Technology Institute > Nano-Electronics Centre
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Fryar, JUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Jayawardena, KDGIUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Silva, SRPUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Henley, SJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : December 2012
Identification Number : 10.1016/j.carbon.2012.07.040
Additional Information : NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Carbon. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Carbon, 50(15), December 2012, DOI 10.1016/j.carbon.2012.07.040.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 19 Mar 2013 11:49
Last Modified : 23 Sep 2013 19:49
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/733924

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