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The impact of a bariatric rehabilitation service on weight loss and psychological adjustment--study protocol.

Hollywood, A, Ogden, J and Pring, C (2012) The impact of a bariatric rehabilitation service on weight loss and psychological adjustment--study protocol. BMC Public Health, 12. 275 - ?. ISSN 1471-2458

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Abstract

Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective form of obesity management for those whose BMI is greater than 40 (or 35 with co morbidities). A minority of patients, however, either do not show the desired loss of excess weight or show weight regain by follow up. Research highlights some of the reasons for this variability, most of which centres on the absence of any psychological support with patients describing how although surgery fixes their body, psychological issues relating to dietary control, self esteem, coping and emotional eating remain neglected.The present study aims to evaluate the impact of a health psychology led bariatric rehabilitation service (BRS) on patient health outcomes. The bariatric rehabilitation service will provide information, support and mentoring pre and post surgery and will address psychological issues such as dietary control, self esteem, coping and emotional eating. The package reflects the rehabilitation services now common place for patients post heart attack and stroke which have been shown to improve patient health outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an article published as Hollywood A, Ogden J, Pring C (2012). The impact of a bariatric rehabilitation service on weight loss and psychological adjustment--study protocol. BMC Public Health 12:275. Available online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/content
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Divisions: Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 26 Oct 2012 15:27
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:45
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/732523

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