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Noisy and individual, but doable: shift-work research in humans.

Kantermann, T, Wehrens, SM, Ulhôa, MA, Moreno, C and Skene, DJ (2012) Noisy and individual, but doable: shift-work research in humans. Prog Brain Res, 199. 399 - 411. ISSN 0079-6123

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Abstract

Working around the clock is common for many occupations, as diverse as nurses, truck drivers, physicians, steel workers, and pilots. Each shift-work profession is individual in more aspects than just work hours and individual work scenarios, each posing a different impact on the health of workers. Related health problems in shift workers, therefore, are also diverse and encompass sleep problems, metabolic and cardiovascular system disturbances, as well as cancer. Little is known about how all these individual factors influence a shift worker's health status, partly because many shift-work studies show inconsistent results. In addition, these individual factors create many methodological difficulties for researchers who investigate such work scenarios. This chapter presents examples from our laboratory and field studies of shift workers, which emphasize the importance of taking individual circumstances into account. Both study approaches, laboratory and field based, are needed to fully account for the difficulties that shift-work studies pose on both workers and researchers. Finally, understanding the mechanisms that underpin interindividual differences in response to shift work will advance our understanding of how to design better and healthier shift-work schedules in the future.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Progress in Brain Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Progress in Brain Research, 199, 2012, DOI 10.1016/B978-0-444-59427-3.00022-8.
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > Biochemistry and Physiology
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2012 08:32
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:38
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/721494

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