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Influence of aggregate fracture on shear transfer through cracks in reinforced concrete

Sagaseta, J and Vollum, RL (2011) Influence of aggregate fracture on shear transfer through cracks in reinforced concrete MAGAZINE OF CONCRETE RESEARCH, 63 (2). 119 - 137. ISSN 0024-9831

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Abstract

Design methods for shear in reinforced concrete structures typically rely upon shear transfer through cracks, which depends upon the crack opening and sliding displacements and the roughness of the crack surfaces. The effectiveness of shear transfer through aggregate interlock is commonly believed to be reduced if the coarse aggregate fractures at cracks, as is frequently the case in high-strength and lightweight aggregate concretes. This paper describes two sets of push-off tests that were carried out to investigate the effect of aggregate fracture on shear transfer through cracks. Marine dredged gravel was used in one set of specimens and limestone in the other. The cracks typically passed around the gravel aggregate but through the limestone aggregate. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of various existing analytical models including those in design codes MC90, Eurocode 2 and ACI-318. The paper also examines the contribution of aggregate interlock to the shear strength of a parallel set of reinforced concrete beams, tested by the authors, which used the same types of aggregate as the push-off specimens

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Thomas Telford Ltd © 2011. Permission is granted by ICE Publishing to print one copy for personal use. Any other use of these PDF files is subject to reprint fees. The definitive version is available at http://www.cement-research.com
Uncontrolled Keywords: Science & Technology, Technology, Construction & Building Technology, Materials Science, Multidisciplinary, Materials Science, COMPRESSION-FIELD-THEORY, STRENGTH, ELEMENTS, BEAMS
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Divisions: Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2012 15:57
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:36
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/713657

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