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Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for people with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled study

Wade, D. T., Gage, Heather, Owen, C., Trend, P., Grossmith, C. and Kaye, J. (2003) Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for people with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled study Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, 74 (2). pp. 159-162. ISSN 00223050

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Abstract

Objective: To determine whether a programme of multidisciplinary rehabilitation and group support achieves sustained benefit for people with Parkinson’s disease or their carers.

Methods: The study was a randomised controlled crossover trial comparing patients and carers who had received rehabilitation four months before assessment with those who had not. Patients were recruited from a neurology clinic, attended a day hospital from home weekly for six weeks using private car or hospital transport, and received group educational activities and individual rehabilitation from a multidisciplinary team. Patients were assessed at entry and at six months using a 25 item self assessment Parkinson’s disease disability questionnaire, Euroqol-5d, SF-36, PDQ-39, hospital anxiety and depression scale, and timed stand-walk-sit test. Carers were assessed using the carer strain index and Euroqol-5d.

Results: 144 people with Parkinson’s disease without severe cognitive losses and able to travel to hospital were registered (seven were duplicate registrations); 94 had assessments at baseline and six months. Repeated measures analysis of variance comparing patients at the 24 week crossover point showed that those receiving rehabilitation had a trend towards better stand-walk-sit score (p = 0.093) and worse general and mental health (p = 0.002, p = 0.019). Carers of treated patients had a trend towards more strain (p = 0.086). Analysis comparing patients before and six months after treatment showed worsening in disability, quality of life, and carer strain.

Conclusions: Patients with Parkinson’s disease decline significantly over six months, but a short spell of multidisciplinary rehabilitation may improve mobility. Follow up treatments may be needed to maintain any benefit.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: D. Wade, H. Gage, C. Owen, P. Trend, C. Grossmith, J. Kaye; ‘Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation for People with Parkinson’s Disease: A Randomised Controlled Study’; Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 74, 159-162, 2003. © 2003 BMJ Publishing Group
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Economics and Law > Economics
Depositing User: Mr Adam Field
Date Deposited: 27 May 2010 14:10
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 18:29
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/576

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