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Sleep Deprivation in the Dark Period Does Not Impair Memory in OF1 Mice

Palchykova, S, Winsky-Sommerer, R and Tobler, I (2009) Sleep Deprivation in the Dark Period Does Not Impair Memory in OF1 Mice CHRONOBIOL INT, 26 (4). 682 - 696. ISSN 0742-0528

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Abstract

There is increasing evidence that sleep facilitates memory acquisition and consolidation. Moreover, the sleep-wake history preceding memory acquisition and retention as well as circadian timing may be important. We showed previously that sleep deprivation (SD) following learning in OF1 mice impaired their performance on an object recognition task. The learning task was scheduled at the end of the 12 h dark period and the test 24 h later. To investigate the influence of the prominent circadian sleep-wake distribution typical for rodents, we now scheduled the learning task at the beginning of the dark period. Wakefulness following immediately after the learning task was attained either by gentle interference (SD; n = 20) or by spontaneous wheel running (RW; n = 20). Two control groups were used: one had no RW throughout the experiment (n = 23), while the other group's wheel was blocked immediately after acquisition (n = 16), thereby preventing its use until testing. Recognition memory, defined as the difference in exploration of a novel and of familiar objects, was assessed 24 h later during the test phase. Motor activity and RW use were continuously recorded. Remarkably, performance on the object recognition task was not influenced by the protocols; the waking period following acquisition did not impair memory, independent of the method inducing wakefulness (i.e., sleep deprivation or spontaneous running). Thus, all groups explored the novel object significantly longer than the familiar ones during the test phase. Interestingly, neither the amount of rest lost during the SD interventions nor the amount of rest preceding acquisition influenced performance. However, the total amount of rest obtained by the control and SD mice subjected to acquisition at “dark offset” correlated positively (r = 0.66) with memory at test, while no such relationship occurred in the corresponding groups tested at dark onset. Neither the amount of running nor intermediate rest correlated with performance at test in the RW group. We conclude that interfering with sleep during the dark period does not affect object recognition memory consolidation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an electronic version of an article published in Chronobiology International, 26 (4), 682- 696, 2009. Chronobiology International is available online at: http://informahealthcare.com/
Uncontrolled Keywords: Sleep deprivation, Recognition memory, Running wheel, Mice, Polyphasic sleep-wake rhythm, OBJECT RECOGNITION, PARADOXICAL SLEEP, PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE, CIRCADIAN MODULATION, VOLUNTARY EXERCISE, PRION PROTEIN, RATS, CONSOLIDATION, TASK, HIPPOCAMPUS
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > Biochemistry and Physiology
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 24 May 2012 12:29
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:20
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/375307

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