University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Tactile elevation perception in blind and sighted participants and its implications for tactile map creation.

Jehoel, S, Sowden, PT, Ungar, S and Sterr, A (2009) Tactile elevation perception in blind and sighted participants and its implications for tactile map creation. Human Factors, 51 (2). 208 - 223. ISSN 0018-7208

[img]
Preview
PDF
Jehoel Sowden et al 2009 Human Factors 51.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (750kB)
[img]
Preview
PDF (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf

Download (33kB)

Abstract

To determine the optimal elevation of tactile map symbols. Background: Tactile perception research predicts that symbol elevation (vertical height) and texture on tactile maps could influence their readability. However, while research has shown that elevation influences detection and discrimination thresholds for single tactile stimuli, and that the physiological response of fingertip receptors varies with texture, little is known about the influence of these parameters on the identification of stimuli in the context of multiple symbols as found on tactile maps. Method: Sighted and visually impaired participants performed tactile symbol identification tasks. In Experiment 1, we measured the effect of elevation on identification accuracy. In Experiment 2, we measured the effect of elevation and symbol texture on identification speed. Results: Symbol elevation influenced both speed and accuracy of identification with thresholds being higher than found in work on detection and discrimination but lower than on existing tactile maps. Further, as predicted from existing knowledge of tactile perception, rough features were identified more quickly than smooth ones. Finally, visually impaired participants performed better than sighted ones. Conclusion: The symbol elevations necessary for identification (0.040 to 0.080 mm) are considerably lower than would be expected on the basis of existing tactile maps (generally 0.5 mm or higher) and design guidelines (0.4 mm). Application: Tactile map production costs could be reduced and map durability increased by reducing symbol elevation. Further, legibility of maps could be improved by using rough features, which are read more easily, and smaller symbols, which reduces crowding of graphics.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an electronic version of a paper published as Jehoel S, Sowden PT, Ungar S, Sterr A (2009). Tactile elevation perception in blind and sighted participants and its implications for tactile map creation. Human Factors 51(2):208-223. Available online at: http://hfs.sagepub.com/content/51/2/208
Uncontrolled Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Communication Aids for Disabled, Female, Humans, Information Systems, Male, Middle Aged, Psychophysics, Space Perception, Visually Impaired Persons, Young Adult
Related URLs:
Divisions: Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 27 Jul 2012 12:31
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2014 13:20
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/311000

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800