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Investigating the underlying mechanisms of categorical perception of colour using the Event-Related Potential technique

Clifford, A, Franklin, A, Holmes, A and Davies, IRL (2011) Investigating the underlying mechanisms of categorical perception of colour using the Event-Related Potential technique In: Progress in Colour Studies: New Directions in Colour Studies. John Benjamins, Amsterdam, NL, Amsterdam and Philadelphia, 237 - 250. ISBN 9027211884

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Abstract

Categorical perception (CP) of colour is demonstrated by faster and more accurate discrimination of colours that cross a category boundary than equivalently spaced colours from the same colour category. Despite a plethora of behavioural research investigating the origin and nature of colour CP, the underlying mechanisms involved in the effect are still unresolved. A recent body of work has made use of the Event-Related Potential (ERP) technique, which involves the measurement of event-related brain potentials at the scalp, enabling exploration of the time course of neural processes that are involved in colour CP. The merits of the ERP technique are presented and five studies that have used this approach to investigate colour CP and colour categorisation are reviewed. Each is discussed in relation to the debate about the origin and nature of colour category effects.

Item Type: Book Section
Additional Information: This is an electronic version of a paper published as: Clifford AM, Franklin A, Holmes A, Davies IRL (2011). Investigating the underlying mechanisms of categorical perception of colour using the Event-Related Potential technique In Progress in Colour Studies: New Directions in Colour Studies. Editors: Biggam CP, Hough CJ, Simmons KD. 237-250. John Benjamins, Amsterdam, NL, Amsterdam and Philadelphia. Posted with the publisher's permission. To re-use or reprint this material in any form, please contact the publisher. Available at http://www.benjamins.com/cgi-bin/welcome.cgi
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Divisions: Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences > Psychology
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 08 May 2012 16:04
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:14
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/231721

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