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Human non-visual responses to simultaneous presentation of blue and red monochromatic light.

Papamichael, C, Skene, DJ and Revell, VL (2012) Human non-visual responses to simultaneous presentation of blue and red monochromatic light. Journal of Biological Rhythms, 27 (1). pp. 70-78.

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Abstract

Blue light sensitivity of melatonin suppression and subjective mood and alertness responses in humans is recognised as being melanopsin based. Observations that long wavelength (red) light can potentiate responses to subsequent short wavelength (blue) light have been attributed to the bistable nature of melanopsin whereby it forms stable associations with both 11-cis and alltrans isoforms of retinaldehyde and uses light to transition between these states. The current study examined the effect of concurrent administration of blue and red monochromatic light, as would occur in real-world white light, on acute melatonin suppression and subjective mood and alertness responses in humans. Young healthy males (18-35 years; n = 21) were studied in highly controlled laboratory sessions that included an individually timed 30 min light stimulus of blue (λmax 479 nm) or red (λmax 627 nm) monochromatic light at varying intensities (1013 - 1014 photons/cm2/s) presented, either alone or in combination, in a within-subject randomised design. Plasma melatonin levels and subjective mood and alertness were assessed at regular intervals relative to the light stimulus. Subjective alertness levels were elevated after light onset irrespective of light wavelength or irradiance. For melatonin suppression, a significant irradiance response was observed with blue light. Co-administration of red light, at any of the irradiances tested, did not significantly alter the response to blue light alone. Under the current experimental conditions the primary determinant of the melatonin suppression response was the irradiance of blue 479 nm light and this was unaffected by simultaneous red light administration.

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Biochemical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Papamichael, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Skene, DJUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Revell, VLUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : 2012
Identification Number : 10.1177/0748730411431447
Additional Information : Published in Journal of Biological Rhythms, 27 (1), 70-78, 2012. Copyright 2012 Sage Publications.
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 07 Jan 2014 18:02
Last Modified : 07 Jan 2014 18:02
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/209774

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