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When does stress end? Evidence of a prolonged stress reaction in shiftworking truck drivers.

Ulhôa, MA, Marqueze, EC, Kantermann, T, Skene, D and Moreno, C (2011) When does stress end? Evidence of a prolonged stress reaction in shiftworking truck drivers. Chronobiology International, 28 (9). pp. 810-818.

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Abstract

This study aimed to analyze individual cortisol levels in relation to work conditions, sleep, and health parameters among truck drivers working day shifts (n?=?21) compared to those working irregular shifts (n?=?21). A total of 42 male truck drivers (39.8???6.2 yrs) completed questionnaires about sociodemographics, job content, work environment, health, and lifestyle. Rest-activity profiles were measured using actigraphy, and cardiovascular blood parameters were collected. Salivary cortisol samples were obtained: (i) at waking time, (ii) 30?min after waking, and (iii) at bedtime, during both one workday and one day off from work. Irregular-shift workers, compared to day-shift workers, showed significantly higher waist-hip ratio, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, tiredness after work, years working as a driver, truck vibration, and less job demand (p?<?.05). High cortisol levels in irregular-shift workers were correlated with certain stressors, such as short sleep duration and low job satisfaction, and to metabolic parameters, such as total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), VLDL, and triglycerides. Day-shift workers had higher cortisol levels collected 30?min after waking (p?=?.03) and a higher cortisol awakening response (CAR; p?=?.02) during workdays compared to off days. Irregular-shift workers had higher cortisol levels on their off days compared to day-shift workers (p?=?.03). In conclusion, for the day-shift workers, a higher cortisol response was observed on workdays compared to off days. Although no direct comparisons could be made between groups for work days, on off days the irregular-shift workers had higher cortisol levels compared to day-shift workers, suggesting a prolonged stress response in the irregular-shift group. In addition, cortisol levels were correlated with stressors and metabolic parameters. Future studies are warranted to investigate further stress responses in the context of irregular work hours. (Author correspondence: crmoreno@usp.br ).

Item Type: Article
Divisions : Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > School of Biosciences and Medicine > Department of Biochemical Sciences
Authors :
AuthorsEmailORCID
Ulhôa, MAUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Marqueze, ECUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Kantermann, TUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Skene, DUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Moreno, CUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date : November 2011
Identification Number : 10.3109/07420528.2011.613136
Additional Information : This is an electronic version of an article published in Chronobiology International 28(9):810-818 Nov 2011. Chronobiology International is available online at: http://informahealthcare.com/cbi
Depositing User : Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited : 07 Jan 2014 17:57
Last Modified : 07 Jan 2014 17:57
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/209773

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