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Food-chain selenium and human health: spotlight on speciation

Rayman, MP, Infante, HG and Sargent, M (2008) Food-chain selenium and human health: spotlight on speciation BRIT J NUTR, 100 (2). 238 - 253. ISSN 0007-1145

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Abstract

There is a growing appreciation that it is not just the total intake of dietary selenium (Se) that is important to health but that the species of Se ingested may also be important. This review attempts to catalogue what is known about Se species in food sources and supplements and the health effects in which they are implicated. The biosynthetic pathways involved in Se assimilation by plants and the way in which Se species are metabolized in animals are presented in order to give an insight into the species likely to be present in plant and animal foods. Known data on the species of Se in the food chain and in food supplements are tabulated along with their concentrations and the analytical methodology used. The latter is important since identification that is only based on retention time matching with authentic standards must be considered as tentative: for evidence of structural confirmation, fragmentation of the molecular ion in addition to MS data is required. Bioavailability, as normally defined, is higher for organic Se species. Health effects, both beneficial and toxic, thought to be associated with specific Se species are described. Potent antitumour effects have been attributed to the low-molecular-weight species, Se-methyl-selenocysteine and its γ-glutamyl-derivative, found in a number of edible plants of the Allium and Brassica families. There remain considerable gaps in our knowledge of the forms of Se that naturally occur in foods. Without adequate knowledge of Se speciation, false conclusions may be drawn when assessing Se requirements for optimal health.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright 2007 Cambridge University Press.
Uncontrolled Keywords: selenium, speciation, selenium in foods, human health, PLASMA-MASS SPECTROMETRY, HPLC-ICP-MS, PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY, CANCER PREVENTION, BRAZIL NUTS, SELENOAMINO ACIDS, CHEMICAL FORM, CARCINOSTATIC ACTIVITY, LENTINULA-EDODES, SODIUM SELENITE
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > Nutrition and Metabolism
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2012 16:42
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:06
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/184938

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