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System-level strategies for studying the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Beste, DJV and McFadden, J (2010) System-level strategies for studying the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Molecular Biosystems, 6 (12). 2363 - 2372. ISSN 1742-206X

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Abstract

Despite decades of research many aspects of the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remain unclear and this is reflected in the antiquated tools available to treat and prevent tuberculosis and consequently this disease remains a serious public health problem. Important discoveries linking M. tuberculosis’s metabolism and pathogenesis have renewed interest in this area of research. Previous experimental studies were limited to the analysis of individual genes or enzymes whereas recent advances in computational systems biology and high throughput experimental technologies now allow metabolism to be studied on a genome scale. Here we discuss the progress being made in applying system level approaches to studying the metabolism of this important pathogen. The information from these studies will fundamentally change our approach to tuberculosis research and lead to new targets for therapeutic drugs and vaccines.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright 2010 Royal Society of Chemistry
Uncontrolled Keywords: metabolism, Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Tuberculosis
Related URLs:
Divisions: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences > Microbial and Cellular Sciences
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 23 Apr 2012 09:57
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:06
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/184934

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