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Structural relaxation of spin-cast glassy polymer thin films as a possible factor in dewetting.

Richardson, H, Carelli, C, Keddie, JL and Sferrazza, M (2003) Structural relaxation of spin-cast glassy polymer thin films as a possible factor in dewetting. Eur Phys J E Soft Matter, 12 (3). 437 - 440. ISSN 1292-8941

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Abstract

Reiter has recently reported a situation in which the dewetting of quasi-solid films is linked to plastic deformation--rather than viscous flow--resulting from capillary forces. Herein we propose that, in thin films of some glassy polymers--especially poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)--prepared by spin-casting from solvent, structural relaxation might impart sufficient stress to cause plastic deformation. We find that PMMA films decrease in thickness by several percent, which is sufficient to create significant stress in those cases in which the film is attached to a rigid substrate. The floating technique, which can take tens of minutes, might allow most of the structural relaxation to occur prior to dewetting experiments.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The original publication is available at http://www.springerlink.com
Divisions: Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Physics
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2012 12:47
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:04
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/158567

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