University of Surrey

Test tubes in the lab Research in the ATI Dance Research

Antecedents for the Adoption and Execution of Supply Chain Management

Kotzab, H, Teller, C, Grant, DB and Sparks, L (2011) Antecedents for the Adoption and Execution of Supply Chain Management Supply Chain Management – an International Journal, 16 (4). 231 - 245. ISSN 1359-8546

[img]
Preview
PDF
HkCtDgLs_SCM_IJ2011.pdf
Available under License : See the attached licence file.

Download (749kB)
[img]
Preview
PDF (licence)
SRI_deposit_agreement.pdf

Download (33kB)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that includes drivers of supply chain management (SCM) adoption and execution identified in the literature, provide a set of measurement scales that operationalise constructs within this model, empirically verify a hierarchical order of antecedents that affects the adoption and execution of SCM, and assist management by providing a focus on those SCM conditions and processes that need to be prioritised to increase successful SCM adoption and execution. Design: The conceptual model is tested empirically through a survey of 174 senior supply chain managers representing the biggest organisations within a central European country. Findings: Using structural equation modelling the hypothesised hierarchical order of three proposed antecedents are verified: ‘internal SCM conditions’ that affect ‘joint or external SCM conditions’ which in turn influences collaborative ‘SCM-related processes’. Firms that adopt these steps should enjoy a rigorous and appropriate road to the full execution of SCM. Research limitations: The survey results reflect the views of large organisations in a countryspecific supply chain setting. Practical implications: The findings provide a hierarchical focus for financial, personnel and management initiatives to increase integration within a supply chain and improve competitiveness. Originality/value: The major contribution of this paper is that it provides empirical proof of the antecedents that affect the adoption and execution of SCM.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is © Emerald Group Publishing and permission has been granted for this version to appear here. Emerald does not grant permission for this article to be further copied/distributed or hosted elsewhere without the express permission from Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Related URLs:
Divisions: Faculty of Business, Economics and Law > Surrey Business School
Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
Date Deposited: 08 Feb 2012 11:11
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 19:03
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/148861

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year


Information about this web site

© The University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
+44 (0)1483 300800