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Nanoengineering of materials for field emission display technologies

Silva, S. R. P., Carey, JD, Chen, G. Y., Cox, D. C., Forrest, R. D., Poa, C. H., Smith, R. C., Tang, Y. F. and Shannon, J. M. (2004) Nanoengineering of materials for field emission display technologies IEE Proceedings in Circuits, Devices and Systems, 51. pp. 489-496.

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Abstract

The holy grail in terms of flat panel displays has been an inexpensive process for the production of large area 'hang on the wall' television that is based on an emissive technology. Electron field emission displays, in principle, should be able to give high quality pictures with good colour saturation, and, if suitable technologies for the production of cathodes over large areas were to be made available, at low cost. This requires a process technology where temperatures must be maintained below 450/spl deg/C throughout the entire production cycle to be consistent with the softening temperature of display glass. In this paper we propose three possible routes for nanoscale engineering of large area cathodes using low temperature processing that can be integrated into a display technology. The first process is based on carbon nanotube-polymer composites that can be screen printed over large areas and show electron field emission properties comparable with some of the best aligned nanotube arrays. The second process is based on the large area growth of carbon nanofibres directly onto substrates held at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 300/spl deg/C, thereby making it possible to use inexpensive substrates. The third process is based on the use of excimer laser processing of amorphous silicon for the production of lithography-free large area three terminal nanocrystalline silicon substrates. Each route has its own advantages and flexibility in terms of incorporation into an existing display technology. The harnessing of these synergies will be highlighted together with the properties of the cathodes developed for the differing technologies.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This paper is a postprint of a paper submitted to and accepted for publication in IEE Proceedings in Circuits, Devices and Systems, 51, 489-496, and is subject to IEE Copyright.The published copy of record is available at IEE Digital Library.© 2004 IEE.
Divisions: Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences > Electronic Engineering > Advanced Technology Institute > Nano-Electronics Centre
Depositing User: Mr Adam Field
Date Deposited: 27 May 2010 14:38
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2013 18:31
URI: http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/id/eprint/1228

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